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    In March and October 2014 I spent time in South Africa with a Non-profitable Organisation called Agêlêla. Agêlêla (a Northern Sotho word meaning ‘to build up or edify) was established to assist business owners in the informal business sector.  With the unemployment rate at 25%, the informal sector makes a considerable contribution to the creation of employment and income generation in South Africa. It is also a source of sustenance for the majority of the unskilled and socially marginalised population.         
 Khensi (Community Liaison Manager) at home in Mamelodi.  “For me something great is coming to reality.”   
 Georgina runs a baking business form home.
 Georgina in her kitchen
  Gladys, who does baking, qualified for a small loan of R 3000 (approx $300) after attending the course. She bought a new stove after opening a bank account with Capitec Bank and could proof that she keeps track of her income and expenses. Previously she had to go out and sell her baking during lunch time to fabric workers. It is no longer the case and she sells from home which is much easier for her since she is in her sixties.
 Gladys in her backyard. Her dream is to build a bakery here. Gladys is holding a book "Business is about Balance" that was written by Cobi and Khensi as a result of the course.
 Gladys and her mother, Grace, who lives with the family.
 Daphne runs a school canteen business, providing meals to high school students. 
 Jafta Mahlanga High School where Daphne sells her food. She sells all food left over at the markets after she visits the high school.
 Some of Daphne's customers
 Meals cost  R10 (approximately $1).
 Zakes and Albert's Hairdressers
 Zakes and Albert
agelela (38 of 40).jpg
 Cobi and Khensi in Zakes and Albert's hairdressers.   “Will the reality of collective poverty and social injustices not become an illusion when we no longer deny, but rather embrace the abundance from with-in?     This is the question we confront ourselves with at the moment, as travelers on life’s journey and as persons who would like to make a meaningful existence in our careers.” Agêlêla - Building Up from Within
   
  
 
  
    
  
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    In March and October 2014 I spent time in South Africa with a Non-profitable Organisation called Agêlêla. Agêlêla (a Northern Sotho word meaning ‘to build up or edify) was established to assist business owners in the informal business sector.  With the unemployment rate at 25%, the informal sector makes a considerable contribution to the creation of employment and income generation in South Africa. It is also a source of sustenance for the majority of the unskilled and socially marginalised population.         
Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} In March and October 2014 I spent time in South Africa with a Non-profitable Organisation called Agêlêla. Agêlêla (a Northern Sotho word meaning ‘to build up or edify) was established to assist business owners in the informal business sector. With the unemployment rate at 25%, the informal sector makes a considerable contribution to the creation of employment and income generation in South Africa. It is also a source of sustenance for the majority of the unskilled and socially marginalised population.  
 Khensi (Community Liaison Manager) at home in Mamelodi.  “For me something great is coming to reality.”   
Khensi (Community Liaison Manager) at home in Mamelodi.“For me something great is coming to reality.” 
 Georgina runs a baking business form home.
Georgina runs a baking business form home.
 Georgina in her kitchen
Georgina in her kitchen
  Gladys, who does baking, qualified for a small loan of R 3000 (approx $300) after attending the course. She bought a new stove after opening a bank account with Capitec Bank and could proof that she keeps track of her income and expenses. Previously she had to go out and sell her baking during lunch time to fabric workers. It is no longer the case and she sells from home which is much easier for her since she is in her sixties.
Gladys, who does baking, qualified for a small loan of R 3000 (approx $300) after attending the course. She bought a new stove after opening a bank account with Capitec Bank and could proof that she keeps track of her income and expenses. Previously she had to go out and sell her baking during lunch time to fabric workers. It is no longer the case and she sells from home which is much easier for her since she is in her sixties.
 Gladys in her backyard. Her dream is to build a bakery here. Gladys is holding a book "Business is about Balance" that was written by Cobi and Khensi as a result of the course.
Gladys in her backyard. Her dream is to build a bakery here. Gladys is holding a book "Business is about Balance" that was written by Cobi and Khensi as a result of the course.
 Gladys and her mother, Grace, who lives with the family.
Gladys and her mother, Grace, who lives with the family.
 Daphne runs a school canteen business, providing meals to high school students. 
Daphne runs a school canteen business, providing meals to high school students. 
 Jafta Mahlanga High School where Daphne sells her food. She sells all food left over at the markets after she visits the high school.
Jafta Mahlanga High School where Daphne sells her food. She sells all food left over at the markets after she visits the high school.
 Some of Daphne's customers
Some of Daphne's customers
 Meals cost  R10 (approximately $1).
Meals cost  R10 (approximately $1).
 Zakes and Albert's Hairdressers
Zakes and Albert's Hairdressers
 Zakes and Albert
Zakes and Albert
agelela (38 of 40).jpg
 Cobi and Khensi in Zakes and Albert's hairdressers.   “Will the reality of collective poverty and social injustices not become an illusion when we no longer deny, but rather embrace the abundance from with-in?     This is the question we confront ourselves with at the moment, as travelers on life’s journey and as persons who would like to make a meaningful existence in our careers.” Agêlêla - Building Up from Within
Cobi and Khensi in Zakes and Albert's hairdressers.“Will the reality of collective poverty and social injustices not become an illusion when we no longer deny, but rather embrace the abundance from with-in? This is the question we confront ourselves with at the moment, as travelers on life’s journey and as persons who would like to make a meaningful existence in our careers.” Agêlêla - Building Up from Within
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